Internship Series Step 2: Filling out the application

Welcome to part 2 of my internship series. If you didn’t know, I’m doing a series on applying for internships and if you missed part one, you can read it here

Today we will focus on filling out the application. I know it seems pretty straight forward, but some applications can be tricky to fill out, so I’m going to discuss some common application mistakes and how to avoid them.

1. Spelling errors

I cannot express how important it is to make sure you proofread your application, and then have someone else to look for anything you might have missed. Having errors on an application says that you don’t pay attention to detail, and that you didn’t put enough effort in to correct your mistakes. If you don’t pay attention to detail on your application, the company might think you may make some careless mistakes on the job and not correct them.

2. Leaving things blank

If something does not apply to you on an application, don’t leave it blank. Instead type N/A. For example, in the previous work experience section ,I listed I job that I am currently working at so in the “reason why you left this position” section, I would either put n/a or “still at this position”.

3. Not having a professional email address.

I don’t think I should have to say this, but for those of you who don’t know, make sure you use a professional email address. This could be your school email address if you are in college, or an email address with your first and last name in it. An example is johnsmith@email.com or janedoe@university.edu opposed to beyoncefan2000@email.com

4. Not following the instructions

This shows the employer that you can’t follow directions and that makes you less desirable. This is especially important if you have to write an essay or do a short answer portion, because it could ruin your entire essay if you read the question wrong. Do yourself a favor and make sure you understand all the questions before you answer them.

5. Exaggerating your experiences

This is a very tragic mistake. The application asks for your supervisor’s information in order to do an employment verification, and if you said you worked at Hearst Magazines, but you really only worked for your school’s newspaper, this makes you a liar. No one wants to hire a liar. The same goes for your job description, while you want to explain what your job duties were in the best way, you don’t want to say you did something that you didn’t.

Did these tips help? What other tips do you have for filling out your job application? And, as always, if you have any questions go to the contact me tab and shoot me a message.

-Tia

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